Travel to Ireland to Learn About St. Patrick

St. Patrick’s Day: Here’s the (Corned) Beef

Dublin, Ireland

St. Patrick’s Day began as a religious holiday, celebrating the anniversary of the saint’s death in the fifth century. Irish families would attend church services in the morning and then celebrate all afternoon despite the holiday falling during the season of Lent. People would dance, drink and eat verboten meat – usually the traditional beef with cabbage.

But after a thousand years, something shifted – celebrations began early in the day. The world took notice and became green with Irish envy. Everyone wanted to partake in the revelry. On March 17th, while wearing “Kiss Me I’m Irish” pins, chewing on soda bread and downing green beer, remember the origins of St. Patrick’s Day.

In Ireland, you’ll find celebrations all over Ireland through this magical land. From Dublin’s Heuston station, reach all points south and west of the city, including cities of green, myth and glass. Get to Galway, birthplace of the Claddagh ring, in less than three hours. Waterford, home to the world-famous crystal factory, is clearly in your sights in just over two hours.

Erin Go Bragh means “Ireland Forever.” After one visit, Ireland will remain in your heart, like a rainbow that never ends.

This entry was posted on Thursday, March 17th, 2011 at 2:48 pm and is filed under Food in Europe. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

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